Kids Judge their Bodies, How You can Help

Kids Judge their Bodies, How You can Help

We're all aware on some level that we've learned to judge our bodies through osmosis of the culture we live.  This has been the source of choices that result in impediments to a life of flourishing.  How can we stand in the way of this onslaught and replace the damaging thoughts that shape our self assessments?

 

In previous blogs we’ve established that we are embodied human persons, that the body expresses the person, and that the body and the person can’t be separated. It’s now important to revisit the challenge of separating the value of the person from the appearance of the body.  In what way is the value of my person related to the way I see my body?

 

Well, the perceived answer quickly becomes a personal one, so I’ll just speak from my own experience. I might be able to give a good Sunday school answer, “If I had a God-made price tag attached to my person it would read, ‘PRICELESS.’” Admittedly, it’s easier me to say this about others, but with an internal struggle, that would be invisible to you, I could admit that I am priceless because God sees us as priceless. But if I had to concede that this God-made price tag would necessarily be attached to my body that expresses my person, I would more likely cringe. I evaluate my body with a different kind of criteria and sometimes this means more to me than the value God claims that He has bestowed on me as a person. My husband and I have even occasionally started to exchange comments (when we are sure the kids aren’t around) about our aging bodies. Throw aging into the mix and the criteria with which I tend to evaluate my body’s appearance drastically reduces the number of days I can honestly assign positive value to my own body and therefore my embodied self. 

Read More

The Nagging Question

The Nagging Question

I want my kids to flourish. And yet in the daily waking up, packing lunches and backpacks, school, homework, carpool, extra activities, church and community living and doing it all over the next day, I’ve noticed my kids can feel drained, not flourishing. The feelings that seem to drain them the most come when they perceive that something threatens their personal value and they get caught up with comparing themselves to others, usually in the form of what others have, such as technology, pets, toys, or experiences. Even more ensnaring, is when my girls compare themselves to their own (usually unattainable) expectations of who they should be – it starts so early!

Read More

Episode 3: The Value of the Human Person

The-Conversation-podcast.jpg

Although we would all affirm the value of a human person in theory, have we really thought through the implications of what this would look like in our own lives, let alone the lives of our children? We flourish when we live consistently with the truth regarding human value -- our own and that of others.  When we fail to acknowledge the value and dignity of others, we're actually standing in the way of human flourishing rather than accessing the life to which God has invited us. The Lindas explore what it means to really value another person and practical ways for helping our kids to integrate this value into their relationships. Find out more about our workshop on our website theconversationworkshop.com/workshop.